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Waste Transportation

The transportation of radioactive waste already occurs, but will become frequent on our rails, roads and waterways, should irradiated reactor fuel be moved to interim or permanent dump sites.

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Tuesday
Apr092019

Do not send 50 years of spent nuclear fuel to New Mexico

An op-ed by James Eagle published in the Santa Fe New Mexican.

James Eagle, Ph.D., is a retired chairman of the Department of Operations Research, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, Calif. In his U.S. Navy career, he served on three nuclear submarines, retiring as a captain in the U.S. Naval Reserve. He and his wife, Maj-Britt, live in Santa Fe.

The op-ed focuses on high-level radioactive waste transportation risks.

Monday
Apr012019

House Democrats want $25 million for program to move nuclear waste from San Onofre and other sites

As reported by La Jolla Light.

Yucca Mountain, NV is targeted for off-site transportation, for permanent disposal.

The TX and NM borderlands are targeted for off-site consolidated interim storage facilities, at risk of becoming de facto permanent surface storage.

Monday
Apr012019

Join us for Nuclear Fool's Day in St. Louis, MO! Final event in Mobile Chernobyl speaking tour

The final event in Beyond Nuclear's Mobile Chernobyl speaking tour through MO, KS, and NE over the past two weeks will be in St. Louis, MO on Monday, April 1st. The event will begin at 7pm Central time. It will be held at Schlafly's Tap Room. For more info., see links below:

Join us for Nuclear Fool's Day on April 1st!

This year on April Fool's Day, joion us for a conversation on why nuclear fuel is for fools, and learn how you can get involved in building a clean energy future.

Blog post on Great Rivers Environmental Law Center website: 

 

https://greatriverslaw.org/2019/03/17/join-us-for-nuclear-fools-day-on-april-1st

 

RSVP Form: 

 

https://goo.gl/forms/RmnFWUlW3bImULex1

 

Facebook Event Page:

 

https://www.facebook.com/events/587240801776284/

 

The event is hosted by Kay Drey (Beyond Nuclear's board president), Beyond Nuclear, Great Rivers Environmental Law Center, and Missouri Coalition for the Environment.

Tuesday
Mar262019

3/25 & 3/26--In Nebraska: Mobile Chernobyls? Floating Fukushimas? Three Mile Islands in Transport?

USE for News Release NFP Logo & There Can Be No Peace Without Justice 2016.png

Nebraskans for Peace

There Can Be No Peace Without Justice

 

News Advisory - for Immediate Release

 

In Nebraska: Mobile Chernobyls? Floating Fukushimas? Three Mile Islands in Transport?

 

The Risks of Shipping High-Level Radioactive Waste through Omaha, Lincoln and Nebraska

 

Contacts: Kevin Kamps, Beyond Nuclear, 240-462-3216, kevin@beyondnuclear.org

 

Mark Welsch, Omaha Coordinator for Nebraskans for Peace 402-510-7565 NFPOmaha1970@gmail.com

 

Tim Rinne, State Coordinator for Nebraskans for Peace (in Lincoln) 402-730-6675

 

Just days before the 40th anniversary of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 atomic reactor meltdown (March 28, 1979), join us for a discussion of the high risks of proposed shipments of irradiated nuclear fuel through Lincoln, Omaha and all of Nebraska, and learn how Nebraskans can help prevent it. There are plans to ship some high-level nuclear waste on the Missouri River to Omaha NE.

 

TWO Free Events, open to the public - Monday and Tuesday, in Lincoln and Omaha

 

Monday, March 25, 2019 at 7:00 p.m.

The Unitarian Church of Lincoln

6300 A Street, Lincoln NE

 

Tuesday, March 26, 2019 7pm – 8:30pm

UNO - Community Engagement Center

Rooms 201/205

6001 Dodge Street, Omaha NE

Free parking is available in Lot E - between the clock tower and library - and in all other parking lots on campus.

Just days before the 40th anniversary of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 atomic reactor meltdown (March 28, 1979), join us for a discussion of the high risks of proposed shipments of irradiated nuclear fuel through Lincoln, Omaha and all of Nebraska, and learn how Nebraskans can help prevent it. There are plans to ship some high-level nuclear waste on the Missouri River to Omaha NE.

 

TWO Free Events, open to the public - Monday and Tuesday, in Lincoln and Omaha

 

Monday, March 25, 2019 at 7:00 p.m.

The Unitarian Church of Lincoln

6300 A Street, Lincoln NE

 

Tuesday, March 26, 2019 7pm – 8:30pm

UNO - Community Engagement Center

Rooms 201/205

6001 Dodge Street, Omaha NE

Free parking is available in Lot E - between the clock tower and library - and in all other parking lots on campus.

 

In addition to plenty of Q&A and discussion time, the 90-minute program will include:

 

In Lincoln, an inflatable, full-scale replica of a highly radioactive waste Legal Weight Truck-sized shipping cask will be deployed outside the event.

 

A presentation by Kevin Kamps, Radioactive Waste Specialist, Beyond Nuclear, addressing the safety and security risks of transporting highly radioactive wastes, and irradiated nuclear fuel, on the roads, rails, and waterways, as proposed in legislation currently pending before the U.S. Congress.

 

He will also discuss the risks of nuclear waste indoor wet storage pool fires for the entire region, and the interim alternative of Hardened On-Site Storage (HOSS), as well as the need to stop generating high-level radioactive waste.

 

Unfortunately, the Cooper (Nuclear) Station in Nebraska, a Fukushima twin design on the Missouri River, has been rubber-stamped for an extension by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for 60 years of operations, until the year 2034.

 

An animation, prepared by Scott Portzline, Security Consultant, Three Mile Island Alert (TMIA), about radioactive waste transport risks, will be shown. So too will a 90-second aerial drone-captured video, featuring transport routes in Pennsylvania. A short informational video, “Nuclear Transports – Eye-Witness to Rule-breaking,” also prepared by Portzline, will be shown. Lessons learned from Pennsylvania’s TMI meltdown survivors will be applied to radioactive risks in Nebraska.

Nebraskans for Peace will share information on how to get involved locally.

 

Events are co-hosted by:
Beyond Nuclear; Lincoln Chapter of Nebraskans for Peace; Omaha Chapter of Nebraskans for Peace; National Association of Social Workers, Nebraska Chapter; Antelope Park Church of the Brethren and other groups.

 

- - - -

Nebraskans for Peace is the oldest statewide Peace & Justice organization in the United States. Building upon the long tradition of peacemaking in Nebraska, NFP has continually advocated for dialogue and peaceful resolution of conflicts, while steadfastly promoting the rights of all people throughout its decades-long history.

Tuesday
Mar262019

3/25/19: Beyond Nuclear Mobile Chernobyl presentation in Lincoln, NE

Beyond Nuclear is very thankful to Nebraskans for Peace, as well as the Unitarian Church of Lincoln, for hosting the event.

Here is a link to Beyond Nuclear's radioactive waste specialist, Kevin Kamp's, power point presentation.

As March 28, 2019 marks the 40th annual commemoration of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 meltdown near Harrisburg, PA, it is especially important to learn the lessons, and hear the cautionary tales, from survivors of that disaster -- including what they have to say about the risks of high-level radioactive waste transportation. That is why Beyond Nuclear is featuring the following three short videos as part of its current Mobile Chernobyl speaking tour.

See the following three videos/animations, which were prepared as part of a press conference held in the PA state capitol builiding, conducted by Beyond Nuclear and Three Mile Island Alert on 10/2/2018 (an earlier HLRW transport risk speaking tour stop, which also addressed reactor safety issues):

See a 2.5 minute video entitled "Radioactive Waste Transport Risks in Pennsylvania," showing transport road and rail routes for irradiated nuclear fuel shipments by heavy-haul truck and train, from the Peach Bottom and Three Mile Island nuclear power plants. The video was captured by drone, and shows an aerial perspective on the shipment routes. (As shown in the aerial imagery, and as documented in the 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Yucca Mountain, Nevada High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement map in Appendix G, Figure G-36, Page G-128, as compared to a GIS rail and road network, the heavy-haul truck road route from Peach Bottom is on State Route 74, from Lower Chanceford, to Red Lion, to Dallastown, to York, where the irradiated nuclear fuel shipping containers would be loaded onto the Norfolk Southern railway; in the case of TMI, the irradiated nuclear fuel would use the Norfolk Southern railroad. A special thank you to Dr. Fred Dilger for documenting and confirming all of this in his 2017 documents, posted at the very top of the State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Project's web site.) 

Watch "Eye-Witness to Rule-Breaking," a 2-minute video prepared by Scott Portzline, documenting both low-level and high-level radioactive waste transport incidents he observed with his own eyes, in and around his home in Harrisburg, PA.

Watch a 1-mintue animation entitled "Nuclear Waste Transport," also prepared by Portzline.

And along those lines, read an article, "Mobile Meltdown: TMI Train Troubles," written by Kay Drey and Kevin Kamps (currently serving as Beyond Nuclear's board president, and radioactive waste specialist, respectively), which was published in the NIRS/WISE Nuclear Monitor at the time of the TMI Unit 2 meltdown's 25th annual commemoration in 2004.

All of these lessons learned from TMI, and PA, can and should be applied elsewhere, as in Nebraska, and beyond.