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Uranium Mining

Uranium mining is necessary to provide the "fuel" for nuclear reactors (and also to make nuclear weapons). Historically, uranium mining has been carried out on land occupied by indigenous people - who have often also comprised the work force, and who have suffered the health and environmental consequences. High-grade uranium is a finite resource, therefore disqualifying nuclear power from consideration as renewable energy.

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Monday
Dec142009

Australian indigenous activitists take uranium mine plan to court

The Indigenous Justice Advocacy Network  is seeking a review of a decision to approve the Four Mile uranium mine in South Australia. The company proposing the mine - Alliance Resources Ltd. - will face the challenge from the indigenous group which seeks to protect cultural heritage on behalf of indigenous Australians. The mine was approved by the Australian Environment Minister, Peter Garrett. Garrett is the former lead singer of the band, Midnight Oil, which used to oppose nuclear energy.

Wednesday
Nov182009

Britain's nuclear expansion plans could devastate Kalahari

The hidden cost of Britain's new generation of nuclear power could be the destruction of the Kalahari desert in Namibia and millions of tonnes of extra greenhouse gas emissions a year, The Observer reports. French nuclear giant, Areva, and Rio Tinto are leading the charge to ravage the precious desert ecosystem with new uranium mines in Namibia. The Observer quoted Bertchen Kors, director of the Namibian environment group, Earthlife, who said of the proposed mines: "Large areas of the desert will be inevitably devastated. They will do immense damage. We fear that there will be major contamination of the ground water supplies." A similar situation already exists in Niger, north west Africa, where Areva has mined uranium for 40 years, leaving a legacy of radioactive contamination, water depletion and disease. Areva also won the contract to open Africa's biggest uranium mine - at Imouraren in Niger.

Wednesday
Oct282009

Native American uranium miners still suffering health effects

Native American uranium mine workers and their families are still suffering the sometimes deadly health effects of uranium mining even as corporations push to open new mines. In These Times took a look at the problem while attending the recent Indigenous Uranium Forum at Acoma Pueblo, New Mexico.

Wednesday
Sep232009

Arizona tribes ban uranium mining

The Hualapai Tribe has renewed a ban on uranium mining on its land near the Grand Canyon, reports the Associated Press. The Hualapai join other Native American tribes in opposing what they see as a threat to their environment and their culture. The tribal ban adds to a temporary mining ban on nearly 1 million federally owned acres around the Grand Canyon.

Tuesday
Jul282009

Grand Canyon protected from uranium mining, for now

In just the past couple years, an incredible 8,000 uranium mining claims have targeted the Grand Canyon, but the Obama administration's interior secretary, Ken Salazar, announced this week a "two year hold" on new hard rock uranium mining claims over a million acre area near this National Park. The Havasupai Tribe, the "People of the Blue Green Water" inhabiting a particularly stunningly beautiful side canyon downstream from a proposed uranium mine, are holding a rally at a sacred site this weekend to protest against uranium mining in the Grand Canyon. Environmental Working Group first raised the alarm about proposed uranium mining near the Grand Canyon over two years ago.