BEYOND NUCLEAR PUBLICATIONS

Search
JOIN OUR NETWORK

     

     

DonateNow

 

 

Uranium Mining

Uranium mining is necessary to provide the "fuel" for nuclear reactors (and also to make nuclear weapons). Historically, uranium mining has been carried out on land occupied by indigenous people - who have often also comprised the work force, and who have suffered the health and environmental consequences. High-grade uranium is a finite resource, therefore disqualifying nuclear power from consideration as renewable energy.

.................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Wednesday
Jul052017

Groups go to court in Australia to block Yeelirrie uranium project

36 million tonnes of radioactive mine waste. A mine pit 9 kilometres long. Extinction of 11 species. Over 40 years of opposition by Traditional Owners. A name that means “place of death” in local language. This is the story of a uranium proposal, and a place called Yeelirrie.

The Yeelirrie uranium project is a uranium deposit located approximately 70 km southwest of Wiluna, in the Mid West region of Western Australia. The name Yeelirrie is taken from the local sheep station and, in the local Aboriginal language, means "place of death". The proposed site is owned by BHP Billiton.

There is a proposal to mine other uranium deposits in the Wiluna area: the Lake Maitland, Centipede, Millipede and Lake Way uranium projects.

On July 3, the Conservation Council of Western Australia went to the Supreme Court with Tjiwarl Traditional Owners to stand up for country, to uphold environment laws, and to stop a toxic uranium proposal becoming a precedent for wildlife extinction across the state. More

Monday
Feb062017

170 Conservation Groups Urge Senate to Reject Zinke for Interior Secretary

As reported in an environmental coalition press release: Congressman Would Do Irreparable Damage to Endangered Species, Public Lands, Climate.

In a letter to U.S. Senators, Beyond Nuclear joined with Center for Biological Diversity, Friends of the Earth, Public Citizen, and 166 more groups to urge they vote against Trump's nominee for Interior Secretary, Ryan Zinke, Republican U.S. Representative from Montana.

While the letter and press release focus on the risk that Zinke would permit the dramatic expansion of fossil fuel extraction on public lands, the same could be said of uranium extraction for nuclear power.

Monday
Oct172016

Center for Biological Diversity: Protect Grand Canyon's Magnificent Watershed

Greater Grand Canyon region

Action alert from Center for Biological Diversity:

People come from all over the world to experience the natural splendor of the Grand Canyon. Its mile-deep gorge can be seen from space, and its rugged landscape is a testament to the grandeur of the American wilderness. Tragically, the lands surrounding the national park remain unprotected and open to exploitation -- a problem we can't ignore.

In 1919 Grand Canyon National Park was designated -- but the need to safeguard its watershed, whose springs and streams feed the Colorado River, was overlooked. That means toxic uranium mining and old-growth logging projects continue to crop up just outside the park's borders, threatening to mar the landscape and poison the Colorado River, which supplies water to millions of people downstream.

Unfortunately Congress isn't likely to support a national monument proposal in time to protect this priceless place, so we're urging President Obama to use his power under the Antiquities Act to forever protect these lands for future generations.

Act now to lend your support to the cause. Urge President Obama to designate the Greater Grand Canyon Heritage National Monument.

Click here to take action and get more information.

Friday
Sep302016

Native American Forum on Nuclear Issues, Oct. 10-11, 2016, U. of NV Las Vegas

Native Community Action Council logoBeyond Nuclear is honored and privileged to be invited by the Native Community Action Council (NCAC) to present at its Native American Forum on Nuclear Issues, taking place on October 10 & 11, 2016, at the University of Nevada in Las Vegas (UNLV).

See the event flier here.

See the agenda/program here.

The Forum is sponsored by the UNLV Academic Multicultural Resource Center and UNLV Boyd School of Law.

Learn more about NCAC at its website.

Tuesday
Aug302016

A powerful reminder of the exploitation of Africa for uranium