BEYOND NUCLEAR PUBLICATIONS

Search
JOIN OUR NETWORK

     

     

DonateNow

Uranium Mining

Uranium mining is necessary to provide the "fuel" for nuclear reactors (and also to make nuclear weapons). Historically, uranium mining has been carried out on land occupied by indigenous people - who have often also comprised the work force, and who have suffered the health and environmental consequences. High-grade uranium is a finite resource, therefore disqualifying nuclear power from consideration as renewable energy.

.................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Monday
Oct172016

Center for Biological Diversity: Protect Grand Canyon's Magnificent Watershed

Greater Grand Canyon region

Action alert from Center for Biological Diversity:

People come from all over the world to experience the natural splendor of the Grand Canyon. Its mile-deep gorge can be seen from space, and its rugged landscape is a testament to the grandeur of the American wilderness. Tragically, the lands surrounding the national park remain unprotected and open to exploitation -- a problem we can't ignore.

In 1919 Grand Canyon National Park was designated -- but the need to safeguard its watershed, whose springs and streams feed the Colorado River, was overlooked. That means toxic uranium mining and old-growth logging projects continue to crop up just outside the park's borders, threatening to mar the landscape and poison the Colorado River, which supplies water to millions of people downstream.

Unfortunately Congress isn't likely to support a national monument proposal in time to protect this priceless place, so we're urging President Obama to use his power under the Antiquities Act to forever protect these lands for future generations.

Act now to lend your support to the cause. Urge President Obama to designate the Greater Grand Canyon Heritage National Monument.

Click here to take action and get more information.

Friday
Sep302016

Native American Forum on Nuclear Issues, Oct. 10-11, 2016, U. of NV Las Vegas

Native Community Action Council logoBeyond Nuclear is honored and privileged to be invited by the Native Community Action Council (NCAC) to present at its Native American Forum on Nuclear Issues, taking place on October 10 & 11, 2016, at the University of Nevada in Las Vegas (UNLV).

See the event flier here.

See the agenda/program here.

The Forum is sponsored by the UNLV Academic Multicultural Resource Center and UNLV Boyd School of Law.

Learn more about NCAC at its website.

Tuesday
Aug302016

A powerful reminder of the exploitation of Africa for uranium

Thursday
Jul162015

Resistance commemorates dark Atomic Age anniversaries in New Mexico

July 16th marks two dark Atomic Age anniversaries in New Mexico of national and even global significance. It's 70 years since "Trinity," the world's first atom bomb explosion, at Alamogordo, NM -- the Manhattan Project "test" for Nagasaki to follow three weeks later. And it's 36 years since one of the worst (and least known) radioactivity disasters in U.S. history, the massive uranium tailings dam release at Church Rock, NM. Ninety million gallons of liquid radioactive waste, and eleven hundred tons of solid mill wastes, spilled into the Rio Puerco River, vital source of drinking and livestock grazing water for Navajo communities downstream.

But resistance to nuclear weapons and nuclear power remains strong in the "Land of Enchantment," despite decades of ongoing radioactive abuses. For example, Diné No Nukes of New Mexico will join with S.A.N.S. and Nuclear Energy Information Service to celebrate a successful fundraiser for their collaborative "Radiation Monitoring Project," purchasing detectors to be used in Navajo country, still contaminated from decades of uranium mining and milling.

And Downwinders and nuclear weapons watchdog groups, including Beyond Nuclear's Alliance for Nuclear Accountability coalition partners Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety, Nuclear Watch New Mexico and Southwest Research Information Center are not only commemorating "Trinity." They continue their decades-long efforts, such as watchdogging the "Birthplace of the Bomb," Los Alamos National Lab; resisting nuclear weaponeers' attempt to keep their omnicidal trade going for decades to come, at unthinkable expense; opposing threatened in situ uranium mining; and outing the truth about the 2014 radioactivity leak at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, NM, to name but a few of their ongoing campaigns.

Thursday
Oct092014

"Uranium? Leave It In the Ground!" film showing & discussion, Nov. 16