BEYOND NUCLEAR PUBLICATIONS

Search
JOIN OUR NETWORK

     

     

DonateNow

Russia/Ukraine/ex-USSR

The former Soviet Union was rocked by one of the world's worst environmental disasters on April 26, 1986, when Unit 4 at the Chernobyl reactor site exploded, sending a radioactive plume across the world. The former Soviet Union is still also the site of some of the world's worst radioactive contamination from its nuclear weapons program.

.................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Wednesday
Nov302016

New Chernobyl Arch at long last installed

The new Chernobyl Arch, shown here under construction a number of years ago. The old Chernobyl Sarcophagus is shown in the background.As reported by the London Guardian, the largest movable structure in human history has finally been installed at Chernobyl. The Arch, as it is called, was decades in the planning, and many years under construction (see photo, left). It had to be built some distance from the radioactive remains of Chernobyl Unit 4, which exploded and burned beginning on April 26, 1986. There even had to be radiation shielding in between what's left of Unit 4, and the new Arch construction site, to protect the workers. This is because Unit 4 is still dangerously radioactive, even though it is within a hastily built containment structure, called the Sarcophagus.

The new Arch has cost a whopping $1.6 billion. The air-tight Arch is intended to suppress radioactive dust, as the old Sarcophagus, at risk of collapse, is dismantled within, by remote control cranes and other high-tech equipment. In that sense, the Arch represents a $1.6 billion, high-tech dust cover, or tarp!

The Arch is only intended to last for a century. It could well need replacement at that point, in order to continue to contain the radioactive hazards within, which will persist for a million years or more into the future.

Given the old Sarcophagus, the new Arch, and the likely need for a replacement high-tech, astronomically expensive dust cover in the year 2116, this situation can be likened to Russian dolls, with a monster-load of hazardous radioactivity that must be contained within.

Tuesday
May032016

Experts present startling findings around Fukushima and Chernobyl at commemorative event

Beyond Nuclear held a stimulating afternoon and evening of presentations, panel discussions and short films to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster and the 5th anniversary of the still on-going Fukushima nuclear catastrophe.  The event took place on May 3rd at the Goethe-Institut in Washington DC and was also supported by the Heinrich Böll Foundation North America.  Beyond Nuclear is also very grateful to our member cosponsors: James Cromwell, Alice and Lincoln Day, Dr. Ian Fairlie, Judi and Lou Friedman, Jay Hormel, Redwood Alliance, and Carolyn and Roy Treadway. Learn more.

Wednesday
Apr272016

TRT World's The Newsmakers: 30 Years Since Chernobyl

As featured on TRT World's "The Newsmakers": Thirty years since the Chernobyl nuclear meltdown, The Newsmakers asks Kevin Kamps [of Beyond Nuclear in Washington, D.C., U.S.A.] and Jonathan Cobb [of the World Nuclear Association in London, U.K.] what lessons have been learnt from the world's worst civil nuclear disaster. [Watch the segment, from the beginning of the recording to the 14 minute 12 second mark.]

Kevin cited Arnie Gundersen of Fairewinds Energy Education's clever line, as reported at Forbes:

“We all know that the wind doesn’t blow consistently and the sun doesn’t shine every day,” he said, “but the nuclear industry would have you believe that humankind is smart enough to develop techniques to store nuclear waste for a quarter of a million years, but at the same time human kind is so dumb we can’t figure out a way to store solar electricity overnight. To me that doesn’t make sense.”

Trying to downplay nuclear power risks, as compared to other electricity generation risks, Cobb cited a hydro-dam break in China that killed a large number of people by drowning, and then disease.

But Cobb failed to mention the risks of a dam breach at the Oconee nuclear power plant in Seneca, SC. As reported by Tom Zeller, Jr., in the Huffington Post, two U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission whistleblowers have revealed, if the upstream dam fails, whether due to an earthquake, terrorist attack, etc., three reactors could be submerged under 16 feet of water, plunging Oconee into a Fukushima-like catastrophe.

Gundersen warned about such "inland tsunami" risks at Fort Calhoun nuclear power plant in Nebraska, during historic flooding on the Missouri River in 2011.

Tuesday
Apr262016

ATHF3 and Swords Into Plowshares Present "Chernobyl + 30: Half-Lives, Half-Truths," Detroit, Fri., May 27, 6-9pm

April 26, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

CONTACTS:

Keith Gunter, Co-Chair, Alliance To Halt Fermi-3 (ATHF3)

Carol Izant, Co-Chair, Alliance To Halt Fermi-3 (ATHF3)

On this 30th anniversary of the onset of the Chernobyl nuclear catastrophe, the Alliance To Halt Fermi-3 (ATHF3), in association with the Swords Into Plowshares Peace Center and Gallery (33 East Adams, Detroit, MI) is proud to announce the opening of "Chernobyl + 30:  Half-Lives, Half-Truths" by photojournalist Gabriela Bulisova. The display will begin on Friday, May 27th, 2016 from 6 PM until 9 PM and extend into Summer 2016.

Ms. Bulisova traveled to the region in the 2000's and captured startling images of Chernobyl landscapes and the affected population.  Her artist statement and captions, coupled with the photos, reflect the story not only of an environmental and human health disaster, but also of a monstrous event resulting in an enormous psychological toll on millions of people.

"Alliance To Halt Fermi-3 is profoundly grateful to the Swords Into Plowshares Peace Center and Gallery for giving us the opportunity to display Gabriela Bulisova's extremely powerful work," said Keith Gunter, Co-Chair of ATHF3.  "This will be a tremendous opportunity for Detroiters to have a long look at what the after effects of a nuclear meltdown look like."

Carol Izant, the Alliance's other Co-Chair, added "This exhibit should give residents of this area reason to pause and think, since a partial meltdown occurred at Detroit Edison's Fermi-1 reactor on October 5, 1966.  We've already had our own close call."

Admission to the exhibit will be free, and will include a display addressing the situation at Chernobyl as it stands three decades later.  "Chernobyl + 30" will open simultaneously at the Gallery with another exhibit addressing the compelling issues surrounding drones.

                                        --- 30 ---
Friday
Sep042015

"Czech agency: Russian spies are focusing on nuclear sector"

As reported by AP:

PRAGUE (AP) — The Czech Republic's counter-intelligence agency says the number of Russian spies remains high and they are particularly interested in the country's nuclear program.

The agency, also known as BIS, says in its annual report published Friday: "Russia does not consider a fight over the Czech nuclear energy sector a lost battle."

BIS says the Russian spies focus on a recently approved government plan to build at least one more reactor at the Temelin nuclear plant and another at the Dukovany plant. They also target anyone whose task is to make this plan reality, it says.

[The] Kremlin is also trying to take control over the Russian community's organizations here, BIS charges, and is building a spy network in Europe, similar to what the Soviet Union did before World War II.