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Radiation Exposure and Risk

Ionizing radiation damages living things and contaminates the environment, sometimes permanently. Studies have shown increases in cancer around nuclear facilities and uranium mines. Radiation mutates genes which can cause genetic damage across generations.

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Friday
Jan152016

Nuclear Hotseat #238: SPECIAL – Porter Ranch/Radon Radiation Risk

Host and producer Libbe HaLevy interviewed Beyond Nuclear's Cindy Folkers and Kevin Kamps, as well as Toledo attorney Terry Lodge (Beyond Nuclear's legal counsel in multiple atomic reactor license interventions), on her Nuclear Hotseat podcast.

The full program is devotedto the radon risk hidden
in the methane gas leak disaster at Porter Ranch in Los Angeles.

Listen to the audio recording online here, and see Libbe's write up about the program below: 

This Week’s Featured Interviews:

  • Kevin Kamps is the Nuclear Waste Watchdog for Beyond Nuclear.  He gives an overview of the problems created by radon and suspicions about its impact on the people of Porter Ranch.
  • Cindy Folkers is Beyond Nuclear‘s expert on ionizing radiation and its impact on health and the environment.  She talks about the health impact of radon and its decay products, emphasizing the need for independent testing at the site.
    Links to the two articles cited by Cindy Folkers as possibly pointing to an earlier start of the Porter Ranch gas leak:
    From August, 2015

    From July, 2014
  • Richard Mathews is a long time resident of the Porter Ranch area who is currently running for state assembly from that district. Richard lives four miles away from the gas leak; he talks about the politics behind the scenes and local activist organizing efforts.
    Petition to have the Porter Ranch gas leak declared a national emergency
  • Terry Lodge is an Ohio trial lawyer living in Toledo who has represented many clients in civil rights, civil liberties, and environmental cases.  He talks on the science as well as legal aspects of this case.

The Missing Link:

Nuclear Hotseat #237 – Byron DeLear interview transcript on West Lake Landfill and legal options.  (NOTE:  Tech glitch; will post on 1/13/16)

And…

…A Reminder to All of the San Fernando Valley from your Friendly Neighborhood Environmental Protection Agency:

Monday
Oct262015

TAKE ACTION: Tell EPA scientific panel to protect the vulnerable from radioactivity

DEADLINE for written comments, and registration to participate on the call, is November 3, 2015. Call is November 10, 2015 noon to 5pm ET. Contact Edward Hanlon (email or call 202 564-2134) to register and/or submit written comments.

The EPA has scheduled a public teleconference with its Scientific Advisory Board Radiation Advisory Committee (RAC). This is the next step following an earlier comment period, as EPA considers possible revision of its 1977 radiation regulations. EPA will brief the RAC on this proposed rule making's scientific aspects, and members of the public will be able to speak and submit written comments. Beyond Nuclear has commented earlier and has updated talking points available.

The first public teleconference will be held from 12:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. ET on November 10, 2015. If all registered public has not been able to comment, a second call will be held November 13, 2015. Speaking time is limited to three minutes.

Thursday
Oct152015

Karl Grossman on radio interview on move to make radiation good for you 

Investigative journalist Karl Grossman is interviewed on Talk Nation Radio on the move by the nuclear industry and its government deregulators efforts to change the rules and "make radiation good for you."

Thursday
Sep102015

“Radiation is Good for You!” and Other Tall Tales of the Nuclear Industry

"The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is considering a move to eliminate the “Linear No-Threshold” (LNT) basis of radiation protection that the U.S. has used for decades and replace it with the “radiation hormesis” theory—which holds that low doses of radioactivity are good for people. 

"In the wake of the Manhattan Project, the U.S. crash program during World War II to build atomic bombs and the spin-offs of that program—led by nuclear power plants, there was a belief, for a time, that there was a certain “threshold” below which radioactivity wasn’t dangerous.

"But as the years went by it became clear there was no threshold—that any amount of radiation could injure and kill, that there was no “safe” dose." Karl Grossman, Beyond Nuclear board member and contributor to  Counterpunch

Saturday
Mar282015

"36 Years of Three Mile Island’s Lethal Lies…and Still Counting"

Photo by Robert Del Tredichi, from his 1980 book "The People of Three Mile Island."Harvey Wasserman has written in commeration of the meltdown at Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 on March 28, 1979. He writes:

"The lies that killed people at Three Mile Island 36 years ago tomorrow are still being told at Chernobyl, Fukushima, Diablo Canyon, Davis-Besse … and at TMI itself.

As the first major reactor accident that was made known to the public is sadly commemorated, and as the global nuclear industry collapses, let’s count just 36 tip-of-the iceberg ways the nuclear industry’s radioactive legacy continues to fester:

For the full article, go to: http://ecowatch.com/2015/03/27/three-mile-island-36-anniversary/."

Wasserman reported directly on TMI’s death toll from central Pennsylvania. He co-wrote KILLING OUR OWN:  THE DISASTER OF AMERICA’S EXPERIENCE WITH ATOMIC RADIATION. Wasserman has invited Beyond Nuclear to Columbus, Ohio on April 11 and 12 to speak out at events in opposition to the crumbling Davis-Besse atomic reactor's proposed multi-billion dollar ratepayer bailout.

A year ago, Beyond Nuclear published a newsletter and website section devoted to telling the truth about TMI. And a quarter century ago, Beyond Nuclear board member, and investigative journalist, Karl Grossman narrated EnviroVideo's first documentary, "Three Mile Island Revisited."