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Other Regions

Attempts to market nuclear power across the globe endanger these societies not only from the routine radioactive contamination and potential for accident or attack posed by operating reactors, but by the opportunity this technology provides to transition to nuclear weapons.

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Tuesday
Jul302019

New Documents Show Corporate and Foreign Interests Seek to Influence U.S. Nuclear Policy

U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings (Democrat-MD), Chairman of the U.S. House Committee on Oversight and ReformWH [White House], Agencies Still Refuse to Produce Documents in Committee’s Investigation
See the press release posted on the website of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Reform, chaired by U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings (Democrat-Baltimore, MD).
Links to primary documents, as well as the two interim staff reports (July 29, 2019, as well as Feb. 19, 2019) are provided there.

Chairman Cummings (photo, right) issued the following statement:

“Today’s report reveals new and extensive evidence that corroborates Committee whistleblowers and exposes how corporate and foreign interests are using their unique access to advocate for the transfer of U.S. nuclear technology to Saudi Arabia. The American people deserve to know the facts about whether the White House is willing to place the potential profits of the President’s personal friends above the national security of the American people and the universal objective of preventing the spread of nuclear weapons.”

The Washington Post has reported on this news. So too has The Daily Beast. The New York Times has published closely related coverage, re: Thomas J. Barrack, Jr., a close friend of President Donald J. Trump for decades, top fundraiser for Trump's 2016 campaign, top Trump Transition official, top advisor, the chair of his Inaugural Committee, and behind the scenes lobbyist. The Times reports: "[Federal] Investigators have also questioned witnesses about Mr. Barrack’s involvement with a proposal from an American group that could give Saudi Arabia access to nuclear power technology."
Monday
Jul292019

Inside the Secret Campaign to Export U.S. Nuclear Tech to Saudi Arabia

Industry coalition’s push to win over the Trump administration is concerning officials on Capitol Hill who are fearful that it could threaten U.S. national security.

As reported by the Daily Beast.

Wednesday
Feb212018

North Korea poised to launch large-scale cyberattacks, says new report

As reported by Anna Fifield in the Washington Post.

In late 2014, a major hack of the South Korean nuclear power industry was reported. The top suspect was the North Korean regime.

Tuesday
Feb202018

Why Trump might bend nuclear security rules to help Saudi Arabia build reactors in the desert

As report by Steven Mufson in the Washington Post.

The article quotes a number of voices skeptical of the nuclear weapons proliferation risks a nuclear power program in the Middle East would represent:

Henry Sokolski, the executive director of the nonprofit Nonproliferation Policy Education Center who served in President George H.W. Bush’s Pentagon, asked, “How do we feel about the stability of the kingdom? The reactors are bolted to the ground for a minimum of 40 years and a maximum of 80 years. That’s enough for the whole world to change.”

...Many experts on Saudi Arabia say the kingdom wants its own program to deter or counterbalance Iran. “I think part of it is keeping up with the Iranians and trying to build up a nuclear infrastructure that could be turned into weapons capability,” Gause said. [F. Gregory Gause is a professor of international affairs at Texas A&M University.]

...“We have a tendency to use nukes as a way of ingratiating ourselves with countries around the world and then we get into a negotiation of whether there are safeguards,” said Sen. Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.). “I think ultimately it’s going to come back to haunt us.”

...Saudi Arabia “would like us to cave to some degree on some elements of the 123 agreement,” said Rep. Brad Sherman (D-Calif.), a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee. But, he added, “the fewer Mideast nuclear weapons states, the better. And the fewer nondemocratic nuclear states, the better. And the fewer states where I can’t predict 10 years down the road what their attitudes will be toward the United States, the fewer of those countries that have nuclear weapons the better.”

Monday
Jun192017

New South Korean president vows to end use of nuclear power