Nuclear Power

Nuclear power cannot address climate change effectively or in time. Reactors have long, unpredictable construction times are expensive - at least $12 billion or higher per reactor. Furthermore, reactors are sitting-duck targets vulnerable to attack and routinely release - as well as leak - radioactivity. There is so solution to the problem of radioactive waste.



VICTORY: DC PSC rejects Exelon Nuclear's takeover of Pepco!

Logo courtesy of Public Citizen's Energy and Climate ProgramThe Washington, D.C. Public Service Commission has voted unanimously to reject Exelon Nuclear's attempted takeover of the Mid-Atlantic electric utility Pepco. This blocks the acquisition, despite other jurisdictions -- including in Maryland, Delaware, Virginia and New Jersey -- having already approved the proposal.

As reported by AP: "[D.C. Public Service] Commission chairman Betty Ann Kane says the companies did not meet their burden of showing that the proposed merger would benefit the public."

Beyond Nuclear has been proud, honored, and privileged to be a part of the PowerDC coalition -- led by such groups as Public Citzen's Energy and Climate Program (see logo, left) -- sending out action alerts to our DC supporters, attending rallies, press conferences, and public meetings, bearing witness at Exelon Nuclear CEO Chris Crane's testimony before the D.C. PSC, etc. PowerDC deserves congratulations and thanks. It has consistently warned about the dangers of Exelon taking over Pepco, from the gouging of D.C. ratepayers in order to prop up dirty, dangerous, and uncompetitive old atomic reactors in IL, to the sabotaging of D.C.'s strides in renewable energy and energy efficiency. More.


"The Iran Nuclear Deal 70 Years After Hiroshima and Nagasaki"

Margaret Harrington, host of "Nuclear-Free Future Conversation" on Channel 17/Town Hall Meeting Televsion in Burlington, VT, interviewed Beyond Nuclear's Kevin Kamps on the Iran Nuclear Deal announced on July 14th, the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombing 70th anniversaries on Aug. 6th & 9th, and the Japanese Abe administration's restart of an atomic reactor at Sendai post-Fukushima, despite overwhelming popular opposition. A major theme of the conversation is how nuclear power and nuclear weapons are flipsides of the same coin. (Note: there appears to be "dead air" and a black screen at the 29:00 to 30:00 minute mark of the interview, but it resumes after that).


Exelon threatens to close three reactors by early next year, absent $1.8 billion IL bailout

NRC file photo of two-reactor Quad Cities nuclear power plant in ILScott Stapf of the Hastings Group's tweet put it well: Nuclear blackmail: Exelon threatens to kill Quad Cities plant if IL lawmakers don't hand over loot.

As reported by Crain's Chicago Business, despite a windfall compliments of regional grid operator PJM (provided at ratepayer expense), Exelon Nuclear is nonetheless still threatening to close its two reactors at Quad Cities, unless the Illinois State Legislature provides it another massive bailout, to the tune of $1.8 billion.

Exelon has also said its downstate single reactor plant, Clinton, could be next to close, early next year, absent the state bailout. A dozen years ago, the Clinton site was a "Nuclear Renaissance" showcase, with a Nuclear Regulatory Commission rubber-stamped "Early Site Permit" for a second new reactor there, a proposal suspended many years ago now.

Nuclear Energy Information Service of Chicago has led the charge in opposition to the state nuclear bailout.

Earlier this week, E&E published an interview with John Rowe in which the former Exelon CEO said that shutting Illinois's uncompetitive atomic reactors is "the proper market-driven answer."


"Prefab Nuclear Plants Prove Just as Expensive"

"Burning money" graphic by Gene Case, Avenging AngelsRebecca Smith has reported in the Wall Street Journal that the "[m]odular method has run into costly delays and concerns about who will bear the brunt of the expense."

The Vogtle 3 & 4, GA, and Summer 2 & 3, SC Westinghouse-Toshiba AP1000 construction sites are featured. At the former, federal taxpayers would be left holding the bag for $8.3 billion in nuclear loan guarantees, if the project defaults. At the latter, ratepayers have been gouged, repeatedly, for many years, to finance the troubled construction.

These cost overruns and schedule delays were to be expected, however, based on the previous history of nuclear power in the U.S. and overseas.



Karl Grossman donates Long Island nuclear power fight records to East Hampton Public Library

Karl Grossman at the PCLI Media Awards, June 7, 2012. Karl Grossman has covered Long Island politics for over 50 years. He is an honored member of the Long Island Journalism Hall of Fame.Karl Grossman, a Beyond Nuclear board member and 53-year investigative journalist on Long Island where he is based, is donating his document collection to the East Hampton Public Library, as he has reported at

Grossman has covered many environmental, political, and social issues over the past half-century, including a major nuclear power fight on Long Island:

From 1966 into the 1980s, the Long Island Lighting Company sought to build seven to 11 nuclear power plants in Suffolk County with Shoreham the first. My files include thousands of records of this ultimately defeated scheme to make Long Island what was termed in the nuclear establishment’s parlance of the time, a “nuclear park.”

Grossman's coverage of that nuclear power fight led to the publication of his 1986 book Power Crazy: Is LILCO Turning Shoreham Into America's Chernobyl?

(Other books on nuclear power by Grossman include his 1980 Cover Up: What You Are Not Supposed to Know About Nuclear Power, and his 1997 The Wrong Stuff: The Space Program's Nuclear Threat to Our Planet, among others.)

As Grossman has described it, his document collection will now provide an Atomic Age, modern era "book-end" for the Long Island archive at the East Hampton Public Library dating back to the Colonial era.