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Japan

Until the Fukushima accident, Japan had 55 operating nuclear reactors as well as enrichment and reprocessing plants which had suffered a series of deadly accidents at its nuclear facilities resulting in the deaths of workers and releases of radioactivity into the environment and surrounding communities. Since the Fukushima disaster, there is growing opposition against re-opening those reactors closed for maintenance.

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Tuesday
Mar202012

Cesium found in plankton 600 km away

Radioactive cesium believed to have been released during the crisis at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant has been found in plankton about 600 kilometers east of the facility, according to a Japan-U.S. joint research team.

The amount of cesium detected in the plankton was far below the government's provisional limit of 500 becquerels per kilogram for marine products, according to the team led by Jun Nishikawa, research associate at the University of Tokyo's Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute.

However, follow-up studies will be necessary because the radioactive cesium is likely to have accumulated in fish that eat plankton, the team said.

The findings will be reported to a conference of the Oceanographic Society of Japan set for Tuesday. The Yomiuri Shimbun.

Friday
Mar162012

Beyond Nuclear's Cindy Folkers discusses Fukushima radiation health effects

See this interview with RT on the Fukushima catastrophe and what is happening today, particularly with respect to human health. Folkers contends that those in Japan who have not yet been moved out of the contaminated areas should be evacuated immediately since even small levels of internal contamination (between 30-50 Bq/kg of cesium) can cause disease.

 

Saturday
Mar102012

3・11One Year After Fukushima Take Action for a Nuclear Free World!

"Let’s move all of our governments to put an end to nuclear power.  We appeal to all citizens in the world to come out on the street, make a human chain, and participate in this creative action.  With one voice: “Let’s Support Fukushima! ” and “Good Bye to Nukes" More.

Saturday
Mar102012

"From Fukushima We Change the World" An appeal to the UN from a Fukushima mother

Sachiko Sato recounts the difficulties of living with radioactive contamination; the rifts it causes among families, the extreme measures needed to avoid health impacts, the difficulties in finding a new life, job, and friends in the wake of relocation. Here.

Saturday
Mar032012

Radiation precautions are not child's play in Fukushima Prefecture

A heartbreaking BBC News Asia video focuses on Ayaka, a young girl who lost her grandfather and home to the tsunami in Fukushima Prefecture on March 11, 2011, and whose life is now circumscribed by radiation precautions that limit her freedom to play outdoors. This, despite now living beyond the arbitrarily small 12.4 mile (20 km) "Dead Zone" around the destroyed Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Her father bought a Ukrainian radiation monitor on the internet, which he uses to check background levels before he lets Ayaka play on the parking lot for at most 30 minutes, only on weekends. She's not allowed to play on the grass, or near trees or surface water, because the radiation levels are higher there. Ayaka also wears a face mask on her way to school, and a personal radiation monitor to track her exposures. Ayaka reads from her diary entry from March 13, 2011, in which she expresses her fear of the invisible radioactivity around her. Writing helped her deal with her emotions -- she was afraid to express her fears directly to her father or grandmother.