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Human Rights

The entire nuclear fuel chain involves the release of radioactivity, contamination of the environment and damage to human health. Most often, communities of color, indigenous peoples or those of low-income are targeted to bear the brunt of these impacts, particularly the damaging health and environmental effects of uranium mining. The nuclear power industry inevitably violates human rights. While some of our human rights news can be found here, we also focus specifically on this area on out new platform, Beyond Nuclear International.

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Monday
Feb132017

Standing Rock: Indigenous Women's Gathering Planned for Feb. 18-19

As reported by Democracy Now! headline news:

Water protectors are organizing an Indigenous Women’s Gathering for next weekend, February 18 and 19, at the main Oceti Sakowin resistance camp. Meanwhile, activists in Bellingham, Washington, shut down Interstate 5 on Saturday as a protest against the Dakota Access pipeline.

[See Democracy Now!'s regular reporting on DAPL and related matters, extending back many months.]

Monday
Feb132017

Report: FBI Terrorism Task Force Investigating #NoDAPL Water Protectors

As reported by Democracy Now! headline news:

The Guardian reports multiple agents from the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force have been attempting to contact water protectors, sparking concerns the FBI may be investigating the indigenous-led movement as a form of domestic terrorism. Civil rights lawyer Lauren Regan said, "The idea that the government would attempt to construe this indigenous-led nonviolent movement into some kind of domestic terrorism investigation is unfathomable to me. It’s outrageous, it’s unwarranted … and it’s unconstitutional."

[See Democracy Now!'s regular reporting on DAPL and related matters, extending back many months.]

Monday
Feb132017

Veterans Return to Standing Rock as Dakota Access Construction Resumes

As reported by Democracy Now! headline news:

In North Dakota, military veterans have begun returning to Standing Rock to support the fight to stop the construction of the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline, which was approved by the Army Corps of Engineers last week. Water protectors say there are an increasing number of helicopters and Bureau of Indian Affairs agents policing the resistance camps.

[See Democracy Now!'s regular reporting on DAPL and related matters, extending back many months.]

Friday
Feb102017

Construction Begins on Final Section of Dakota Access Pipeline

As reported by Democracy Now! headline news:

In North Dakota, construction crews have resumed work on the final section of the Dakota Access pipeline, after the Trump administration granted an easement to allow Energy Transfer Partners to drill beneath the Missouri River. The construction resumed as opponents of the pipeline filed a last-ditch legal challenge in a federal court in Washington, D.C., Thursday. They’re seeking an order halting construction while a separate lawsuit filed by the Standing Rock Sioux tribe proceeds in court. U.S. District Judge James Boasberg says he’ll hear arguments on the motion—on Monday.

[See Democracy Now!'s regular reporting on DAPL and related matters, extending back many months.]

Thursday
Feb092017

Army Corps to Greenlight Construction of Dakota Access Pipeline

As reported on Democracy Now! news headlines:

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has announced it will greenlight the final phase of construction for the Dakota Access pipeline, prompting indigenous water protectors and their allies to call for a "last stand" against the $3.8 billion project. In a letter to Congress, acting Army Secretary Robert Speer said the Army Corps will cancel an environmental impact study of the Dakota Access pipeline and will grant an easement today allowing Energy Transfer Partners to drill under Lake Oahe on the Missouri River. The Army Corps also said it would suspend a customary 14-day waiting period following its order, meaning the company could immediately begin boring a tunnel for the final one-and-a-half miles of pipe. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has promised a legal fight. Tribal Council Chair Dave Archambault II said in a statement, "As Native peoples, we have been knocked down again, but we will get back up, we will rise above the greed and corruption that has plagued our peoples since first contact. We call on the Native Nations of the United States to stand together, unite and fight back." Other indigenous water protectors and their allies have vowed to take direct action to stop construction at the drill pad on the west bank of the Missouri River, less than a mile north of the Standing Rock Reservation. Activists are also planning solidarity actions in cities across North America and beyond. We’ll have more on the fight against the Dakota Access pipeline later in the broadcast.

[See Democracy Now!'s regular reporting on DAPL and related matters, extending back many months.]