Environmental Impacts

The entire nuclear fuel chain involves the release of radioactivity that contaminates the environment. Radiation can affect the air, water, soil, plants, animals, places of residence and recreation and elsewhere.



"Downstream," by Arnie Gundersen, Fairewinds Energy Education

The Great Lakes -- around 85% of North America's surface fresh water, and over 20% of the world's -- provide drinking water for 40 million people in 8 U.S. states, 2 Canadian provinces, and a large number of Native American First Nations.Arnie Gundersen, Chief Engineer at Fairewinds Energy Education, has posted a blog entitled "Downstream," about the radioactive risks to the Great Lakes from dozens of atomic reactors located on their shorelines, in both the U.S. and Canada.

Gundersen has served as expert witness for Beyond Nuclear et al. in numerous challenges to continued operations at risky reactors on the Great Lakes, including Palisades and Fermi 3 in Michigan, as well as Davis-Besse in Ohio.

(Beyond Nuclear's pamphlet, "Routine Radioactive Releases from U.S. Nuclear Power Plants," also shows it doesn't take an accident to cause contamination of surface fresh water supplies, nor coastal oceanic fisheries for that matter. A map is included, indicating which watersheds are impacted by each operating reactor in the U.S.)


Radioactivity in groundwater at Peach Bottom demonstrates "Leak First, Fix Later": industry self-regulated in self-interest

In April 2015, a monitoring well at Exelon’s Peach Bottom nuclear power plant in Delta, Pennsylvania tested positive for a significant level of tritium contamination in groundwater. It is another example of a decades-old pattern of nuclear reactors leaking radioactivity and a weak regulatory system that fails to openly address and fix the problem as required in federal licensing agreements. Beyond Nuclear publicly disclosed the radioactive leak to media along with the release of its updated investigative report “Leak First, Fix Later: Uncontrolled and Unmonitored Radioactive Releases from Nuclear Power Plants.”

Exelon’s 2005 disclosure of ten-year old cover-up of a series of leaks and spills releasing millions of gallons of radioactivity into groundwater and the public right-of-way around its Braidwood nuclear power plant in Illinois led to an industry-wide scandal of unreported, uncontrolled and unmonitored radioactive contamination of water resources around nuclear power plants. The fact that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) turned a blind eye on these leaks and violations of licensing agreements further spotlighted the complacency and complicity of the regulator in failing to enforce reactor performance criteria governing the required control and monitoring of radioactive waste water pathways at the reactors.

“Leak First, Fix Later” finds that U.S. nuclear power industry continues to experience uncontrolled leaks and spills of radioactive water because buried pipes and tanks remain inaccessible to inspection and maintenance. The NRC’s lackadaisical response over the years has allowed the industry to self-regulate groundwater protection in its own self-interest largely with impunity.

Following the industry scandal for failure to control and report radioactive leaks, the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) commandeered national groundwater protection policy away from the NRC with a “voluntary initiative” to self-report unauthorized releases to the environment. But the industry self-reporting system, as the Peach Bottom leak confirms, has singularly failed to address and prevent reoccurring leaks and leaves the impacted public intentionally in the dark, the report finds.

According to the Exelon Peach Bottom leak memorandum, water contaminated with tritium had pooled on the floor inside the turbine building made its way outside into the groundwater monitoring test well. Following Beyond Nuclear’s disclosure in the media, Exelon “declined” to publicly identify what component or system was leaking. While the NRC made no initial request of the company to identify the leak source and how the uncontrolled leak made its way out of the turbine building structure into groundwater outside, the agency told media they would be looking into it.

Uncontrolled and unmonitored releases of radioactive isotopes migrating into the water table can remain dangerous for decades and longer. Tritium, radioactive hydrogen, is clinically shown to cause cancer, birth defects and genetic mutations.  Today’s groundwater can be tomorrow’s drinking water. This uncontrolled problem must no longer be trivialized by industry and regulator leaving others to bear the future consequences and costs.


"Kirk Urges President to Halt Canadian Proposal to Store Nuclear Waste Near Great Lakes"

U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk (R-IL)U.S. Senator Mark Kirk (Republican-Illinois, photo left) has issued a press release, and the text of a letter he sent to President Obama, calling for administration action to protect the Great Lakes against Ontario Power Generation's (OPG) proposed "low" and "intermediate" level radioactive waste dump, targeted at the Lake Huron shoreline at Bruce Nuclear Generating Station.

Sen. Kirk stated: “As co-chair of the Senate Great Lakes Task Force, I am fighting to keep our lakes free from toxins that could harm our precious ecological system and threaten the drinking water source for more than 30 million Americans. Storing nuclear waste underground along the shores of the Great Lakes directly jeopardizes the wellbeing of this shared natural resource, and I urge the President to work with the Canadian Government to postpone this decision and protect our lakes for generations to come.”

In 2011, and again in 2013, Sen. Kirk sent letters of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator. Last year, and again this year, Sen. Kirk has introduced resolutions of disapproval for the site.

In his letter to President Obama, Sen. Kirk stated: "This matter presents an immediate threat to all the Great Lakes, and I ask you to use all diplomatic means available to urge the Canadian government to delay its decision-making process until the proposal has been given all due consideration by the [International Joint Commission."

Sen. Kirk warned: "As a permanent repository, the Kincardine, Ontario facility would hold 7 million cubic feet of nuclear waste for thousands of years. Any leak during that time could unleash toxic material throughout the Great Lakes Basin, and contaminate the largest surface freshwater system in the world while causing irreparable damage to the more than 3,500 [species of] plants and animals that inhabit the ecosystem." (emphasis added)

More information about Canada's Great Lakes shore radioactive waste dump is posted under Beyond Nuclear's Canada website section.


Beyond Nuclear on Thom Hartman's "The Big Picture" re: Indian Pt. fire/oil spill & Chinese proliferation concerns

Thom Hartmann, host of "The Big Picture"Thom Hartmann, host of "The Big Picture," had Beyond Nuclear's Kevin Kamps on to discuss the transformer fires at Entergy Nuclear's Indian Point nuclear power plant, and consequent oil spill into the Hudson River upstream from New York City. Thom and Kevin also discussed the Obama administration's attempt to extend approval nuclear power commerce with China, despite congressional concerns about dual-use technology that could be transferred to China's nuclear submarines, as well as "vertical" and "horizontal" proliferation concerns from reprocessing plutonium (adding to China's own nuclear arsenal, or the spread of nuclear weaponry to other countries or terrorist groups, respectively). (See the segment from the 46:00 minute mark to the 52:15 minute mark.)


Transformer fire at Entergy Nuclear's Indian Point causes thousands of gallons of oil to leak into Hudson River upstream of New York City

Oil sheen seen in the Hudson River near Indian Point nuclear plant following a transformer fire on May 11, 2015 (Credit: Riverkeeper)As reported by CBS New York, a transformer fire took place at Entergy Nuclear's Indian Point Unit 3 (IP) yesterday. New York Governor Cuomo rushed to the scene, concerned about the potential for leaking oil to reach the Hudson River.

Sure enough, it has. As reported by ABC News, the multiple fires did lead to an oil slick on the Hudson River, when an oil overflow tank's capacity was not enough to stem the leakage. Thousands of gallons of oil have reportedly leaked into the river, some 30 miles north of New York City.

Riverkeeper issued a press release, as well as photos (see left), stating that this latest accident is proof positive that IP should be permanently closed.

Beyond Nuclear just took part in an anti-nuclear summit very near Indian Point, held at Stony Point Conference Center on May 3rd. Hosted by Hudson River Sloop Clearwater, the event focused on high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) and decommissioning issues. Beyond Nuclear's presentation addressed HLRW risks at IP, including radioactive leaks from IP's HLRW storage pools, documented in a Beyond Nuclear report and backgrounder. Representatives from NIRS, Citizens Awareness Network, Indian Point Safe Energy Coalition, and Riverkeeper also presented.