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Tuesday
Oct112011

Dominion security film concerned citizen car license plates in North Anna parking lot at post-quake NRC public meeting

On Monday, October 3rd, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) held an "exit meeting" with Dominion Nuclear at its North Anna nuclear power plant in Mineral, VA. The meeting, open to the public, had to do with NRC's findings regarding Dominion's rush to restart its two reactors in the aftermath of the August 23rd, 5.8 magnitude earthquake epicentered about ten miles away. The quake generated ground motions twice what the plant was designed to withstand, which caused visible damage to the facilities. The extent of damage to underground pipes carrying radioactive materials, and to electrical cables vital to safety and cooling systems, remains uninspected and unknown.

After the NRC-Dominion meeting, the floor was opened up to concerns and questions from the public -- including dozens of citizens concerned about safety risks. By chance, Beyond Nuclear's Kevin Kamps happened upon Dominion security personnel videotaping a vehicle with anti-nuclear bumper stickers parked outside the meeting, including its license plate. When given the chance at the microphone, Kevin asked how appropriate it is for Dominion Nuclear security personnel to violate the civil liberties and right to privacy of concerned citizens, taking part in good faith in an NRC-sponsored public meeting. Kevin asked why such meetings could not be held at a public location, such as the local public high school where NRC meetings about the proposed new reactor(s) targeted at North Anna have been held, rather than at the "information center" located immediately adjacent to the front entrance to the North Anna nuclear power plant, a high-security zone.